What are the latest statistics in work-related stress? The latest Labour Force Survey statistics make for anxiety-inducing reading.

Before we dive into that though, let’s understand the current legislation governing stress in work. Here’s what the legislation says regarding work-related stress:

“All employers have legal responsibility under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 to ensure the health safety and welfare at work of their employees. This includes minimising the risk of stress-related illness or injury to employees.”

We’re all responsible for reducing stress and an organisation should implement procedures to reduce stress and support workers.

Work related stress, anxiety and depression statistics in Great Britain 2017/18

All statistics taken from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) show:

  • The total number of cases of work related stress, depression or anxiety in 2017/18 was 595,000, a prevalence rate of 1,800 per 100,000 workers
  • The number of new cases was 239,000, an incidence rate of 720 per 100,000 workers
  • The total number of working days lost due to this condition in 2017/18 was 15.4 million days. This equated to an average of 25.8 days lost per case.
  • In 2017/18 stress, depression or anxiety accounted for 44% of all work-related ill health cases and 57% of all working days lost due to ill health
  • Stress, depression or anxiety is more prevalent in public service industries, such as education; health and social care; and public administration and defence
  • By occupation, professional occupations that are common across public service industries (such as healthcare workers; teaching professionals and public service professionals) show higher levels of stress as compared to all jobs.
  • The main work factors cited by respondents as causing work related stress, depression or anxiety were workload pressures, including tight deadlines and too much responsibility and a lack of managerial support (2009/10-2011/12).

Building Resilience Risk Magazine from Cardinus

Who is responsible for work related stress within your organisation?

At board level

Directors need to consider how they will monitor factors, address stress, carry out risk assessments and plan for stress related risk.

HR and Health and Safety managers

HR and Health and Safety Managers have an important role in assisting employers to proactively address work related stress, and in doing so reduce the likelihood of employees suffering from work related stress.

Line managers

From a line manager’s perspective, legal responsibility rests primarily with the ‘employer’ who is responsible not only for action or lack of action at board level but also for all those employed by him. Line managers have an important role in assisting employers to proactively address work related stress, and in doing so reduce the likelihood of employees suffering from work related stress.

Employees

Employees also have a duty to take reasonable care for their own health and safety and of others who may be affected by their actions.

Find out more about employer and employee responsibilities here.

What Cardinus can do:

  • Provide general consultancy and guidance on all aspects of stress management
  • Training for staff and managers either through e-learning or face to face, including general stress awareness
  • Provide guidance or help in developing safety management systems that include stress management
  • Help/provide guidance in undertaking stress risk assessments

Talk to Cardinus Risk Management today to see how our online solution can help you meet those legal requirements in a cost-effective manner without introducing a resource intensive programme.

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